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End of first term, and elections 1951

by on November 15, 2011

To many, this was a wonderful facade and while Peron was able to increase army and naval salaries, securing his vote with them, the truth of the matter was that Argentina was going bankrupted. (Class reading p. 843) Slowly, but surely, argentine business, banks, press, university and farming industry were begging to feel the repercussions of his actions.  Between 1949 and 1950, capital investment plummeted 70 percent, and while urban wages continued to grow, inflation wiped out labor gains.  In ruins, Argentina had to shamelessly ask the U.S. for a $125 million loan.

Peron did his best to silence the press and intellectuals that had not yet fled the country.  However, the “descamisados” continued to support him regardless, not to mention the popularity that Eva had acquired through his campaign and presidency.  Many people related to her poor and illegitimate background, and looked up to her as a dream they could one day all reach.  The masses were inspired by her and in return adored her.

Second Term

In 1951 elections, Peron main competitor was Ricardo Balbin, a prominent lawyer turned politician who was the front-runner for the UCR (Union Civica Radical).  Peron had not announced his vice-presidency candidate for several months, until he declared Eva as his side runner.  However, shortly after that she became diagnosed with cancer and was forced to step down.

By November, Peron was re-elected with a 62 percent vote (Todo Argentina), 30 percent more than his closest opposition.  This was the first time, women were able to vote and their vote was mostly for Peron.  It was also the first time women made it into congress: 6 made it to the senate, while 21 into parliament, all members of the peronist party.

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